Electric honeycomb: Pakistani Teen Scientific
Only 17 years old and he is already a recognised scientist. Muhammad Shaheer Niazi's research on electric honeycomb was recently published in the Royal Society Open Science journal. Physicists have known the phenomenon of electric honeycomb for decades. It occurs when a layer of oil is placed in an electric field between a pointy electrode and a flat one - and the instability caused by the build-up of ions applies pressure to the surface of the oil - creating a beautiful pattern that looks like a honeycomb, or a stained glass window. The high school student from Pakistan's city of Lahore managed to photograph the movement of ions that forms the honeycomb besides recording the heat found on the surface of oil. No one has done this before. Electric honeycomb phenomenon was the problem given to him at the International Young Physicists' Tournament held in Russia last year. Mr Niazi, and four other students, made up the first-ever team to represent Pakistan at the tournament. Returning from Russia, Mr Niazi decided to get his research published. It took him another year of work to come up with "novel ideas" before his paper was finally accepted for publication. He received the letter of acceptance just days ahead of his 17th birthday last month. "Your research is like your child, and you feel out of this world when it is accepted for publication," Mr Niazi tells the BBC in an interview at his residence in Lahore's posh Sukh Chayn sector. With the slim stature of a teenage boy with curly hair and spectacles sitting firmly on his nose, the young scientist cuts a smart figure. Read More

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